Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Julie Crossen
    Computational thinking
    16 March
    Public discussion Created by Julie Crossen

    We use it in Maths problem solving by getting students to discuss what the problem is and to find quicker, logical ways to work out the problem. We have had staff PD on coding and I have been, with students to a Code Club.

    That sounds very timely and relevant Julie and closely aligned to what I've been viewing in the pīkau too cool.

    Finding  quicker, logical ways to work out problems is a great way to teach students about sorting algorithms (in a Computer Science sense), where there’s a need for computers to process and find the right answers quickly too. None of us have the time or are used to sitting and waiting for a computer to process stuff for too long (100ths of a millisecond) For example, Programmers need to know when they’re dealing with this kind of problem, and choose algorithms that will produce a result in a reasonable amount of time. (Pīkau 17: CTDT PO4-6: Comparing Algorithms).

    In this video, we see Tim and Joanne use two different searching algorithms (sequential search and binary search) to solve the same problem, and then analyse the results with an interesting conclusion. I found all of the videos and content in Pīkau 17: CTDT PO4-6: Comparing Algorithms do well to explain the ‘need for speed’

    I've found the Pīkau very easy to view and incredibly informative. Wondering how everyone else is finding this content too?

    - By Tessa Gray
    NOTE: You have to be a member of the group in order to reply to a discussion
      • Tessa Gray
        By Tessa Gray
        Mar 16

        That sounds very timely and relevant Julie and closely aligned to what I've been viewing in the pīkau too cool.

        Finding  quicker, logical ways to work out problems is a great way to teach students about sorting algorithms (in a Computer Science sense), where there’s a need for computers to process and find the right answers quickly too. None of us have the time or are used to sitting and waiting for a computer to process stuff for too long (100ths of a millisecond) For example, Programmers need to know when they’re dealing with this kind of problem, and choose algorithms that will produce a result in a reasonable amount of time. (Pīkau 17: CTDT PO4-6: Comparing Algorithms).

        In this video, we see Tim and Joanne use two different searching algorithms (sequential search and binary search) to solve the same problem, and then analyse the results with an interesting conclusion. I found all of the videos and content in Pīkau 17: CTDT PO4-6: Comparing Algorithms do well to explain the ‘need for speed’

        I've found the Pīkau very easy to view and incredibly informative. Wondering how everyone else is finding this content too?

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