Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Ngā Kiriahi
    What connections do you see between CT ideas from overseas and Aotearoa?
    12 September
    Public discussion Created by Ngā Kiriahi
    SortingThe term “computational thinking” is widely used internationally, and the concept has been influential in the design of curricula around the world.
     
    What connections do you see between the new computational thinking area in the NZ curriculum and computational thinking ideas from overseas?
     
    What could be sorted in your classroom using the sorting network? Have you used the sorting network? How did it go?
     

    There are many connections across school curricula with regard to what computational thinking is; by and large the one thing that everyone agrees on is that this is critical thinking which aids the creation of digital outcomes by learners. We may use slightly different terminology in the various contexts of our particular countries, however, we are all looking for the same outcome(s).

    Within my digital technologies classes I can see that we might have some fun with the sorting networks by using mathematical equations  - this would/could also challenge the students numeracy skills!

    - By Carolyn Milne
    NOTE: You have to be a member of the group in order to reply to a discussion
      • Carolyn Milne
        By Carolyn Milne
        Jun 18

        There are many connections across school curricula with regard to what computational thinking is; by and large the one thing that everyone agrees on is that this is critical thinking which aids the creation of digital outcomes by learners. We may use slightly different terminology in the various contexts of our particular countries, however, we are all looking for the same outcome(s).

        Within my digital technologies classes I can see that we might have some fun with the sorting networks by using mathematical equations  - this would/could also challenge the students numeracy skills!

        • Tessa Gray
          By Tessa Gray
          Apr 26

          Thanks for sharing your connections Diane Rojos Any explanation for how a computer processes music in Logic X (or any other music-making programme) will help students to understand how the programme operates etc, while making music and sharing this enables them to understand about Designing and Developing Digital Outcomes (inputs, outputs, storage types etc). 

          There are some great network sorting unplugged ideas to explore, so feel free to add any images/responses from classroom experiences (permissions approved of course) here if you do. We'd love to see them. 

          To learn how to add any images or media, there's a video that can help #5 @  https://ngakiriahi.kiatakatu.ac.nz/pages/view/3236/nga-kiriahi-instructional-videos-em

          • Diane Rojos
            By Diane Rojos
            Apr 19

            What could be sorted in your classroom using the sorting network? Have you used the sorting network? How did it go?

            I was really fascinated by the programming of the song Twinkle Twinkle Little star using Scratch2. I have Logic X (music producing software) and this has complex programming algorithm. This example helped me understand the processes and the skills of CT.

            After the school holiday, I will attempt to use the sorting network activity- we will focus on life cycle, making a sandwich or sequencing a story. 

            • Joanne Roberts
              By Joanne Roberts
              Mar 18

              Kia ora @Anne-Louise.Robertson1 I agree that when the students are composing music they are using CT skills. They hear a 'wrong' note and debug to make it sound better. They use loops to repeat parts to give the composition balance. I agree it is examples like this that can encourage teachers to see how DT & HM can be integrated across the learning areas. Also, the perseverance students show when they 'debug' while they are practicing to get each piece correct, that's a great CT skill.

              • Joanne Roberts
                By Joanne Roberts
                Mar 18

                Sina Lologa Great to hear about you using the sorting network in your classroom. Well done for getting the children to draw it up, I know that can be a challenge. I think it is best to start with numbers and then work up to other, more challenging items. I'm glad your class was able to work collaboratively and debug. It sounds like you are naturally dropping the terminology into your conversations too. Well done! 

                • Joanne Roberts
                  By Joanne Roberts
                  Mar 12

                  I tried using the sorting network once to order a list the order of which I wasn't sure of before I put it through the sorting network. I made up 6 reasons not to come to work (car wouldn't start, broken leg, sick etc). I couldn't decide which was the best excuse so thought I'd see what would happen when I put the 6 options through the network. Much to my surprise it worked. Each option was compared with the others and it produced an order which I agreed was a useful order from best excuse to worst. Having to just compare two excuses at a time made it much easier to sort. 

                   

                  • Sina Lologa
                    By Sina Lologa
                    Mar 10

                    I have used the sorting network activity- Room 10 loved drawing the diagrams on the concrete with chalk.  We used numbers to be sorted out in the correct sequence.  Lots of fun and lots of mistakes made.  But in their groups they learned to row their waka together and debug any misconceptions!  

                    • Anne-Louise Robertson
                      By Anne-Louise Robertson
                      Feb 28

                      Kia ora

                      I enjoyed seeing the different ways that the UK, Aus and NZ express the definition of Computational thinking. I do like the visual expression from Barefoot Computing.

                      I think the element of this pīkau that struck a chord with me was the programming of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. It made me think about how so many of our kids are thinking computationally when they are playing musical instruments, composing either on their instruments or on the computer - my son uses a computer program to create music, he uses different elements, repeats, phrasing etc. He probably doesn't see that as computational thinking or programming.  Maybe examples like that will help teachers to see how DT & HM can be explored across the curriculum? 

                      • Tessa Gray
                        By Tessa Gray
                        Jan 8

                        I've really enjoyed working through this short Pīkau - making connections between CT ideas from Aotearoa and overseas, because it's helped to clarify new language of computational thinking (where it comes from) as well as the skills/attributes of thinking like a computer scientist.  

                        New language for me: Logical reasoning, algorithms, decomposition, abstraction, patterns, generalisation - clarified in this 'operational definition':

                        image

                        And the skill set needed for computational thinking.

                        image

                        I also enjoyed the graphic below from Barefoot Computing which would make a great classroom flyer - something to refer to, in any given lesson (reading comprehension to maths problem solving).

                        image

                        In the easy to view videos, Tim Bell has clearly demonstrated these concepts and approaches in the unplugged parallel sorting activity and touched on some great contexts to help clarify the process of sorting in sequence - ie: numbers, musical notes, fractions, stories, life cycles.

                        image

                        Have you used the sorting network activity yet? What contexts for sequencing have you used?

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