Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Tessa Gray
    Best robotic kits for beginners
    21 September
    Public discussion Created by Tessa Gray

    "Robotics supports learning with a focus on problem finding and then problem solving" Enabling e-Learning Robotics

    What robots are you looking at purchasing for your school and what's guiding your decisions? Affordability, easy to use, programable, durable, link to other tools, software applications, open-ended, educational or 'word on the street'? 

    Here are a few tips from Robots in Schools - where do I get robot stuff from (NZ) and here's a more global blog post The Best Robotics Kits for Beginners (Wirecutter New York Times) where they 'scoured websites' and use a criteria to judge the functionality and effectiveness of the robots they tested. More than the commercial items themselves, I thought the criteria was useful:

    • Build and program: Favour for both.
    • A complete package: Everything you need is in the box 
    • Excellent instructions: Step by step instructions are thorough
    • Open-ended: You can build a variety of example robots, plus designs you invent yourself
    • Graphical programming software: A beginner can jump in without prior programming ie: drag-and-drop or similar
    • Expandable: Extra parts or expansion packs are available
    • A reasonable price:  Paying roughly $85 to $300 (American) delivers all of the ideal features for a beginner robotics kit.

    What robots are you buying and what websites, insights are guiding these decisions in your school/kura?

    Also see, Tools and toys post by Nicki Tempero.

    Tags: Dash & Dot, Kiwibots, Robobits, Bee-bot, Blue-bot, Cosmo, Edison, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Lego Mindstorms, Lego Ev3, Sphero, Vex Robotics, Bbot, 2D, 3D

    Robotics

    Image source: Ellsworth Airforce Base: Photo by:  Airman Donald C. Knechtel/Released) |  VIRIN: 151221-F-SE307-031.jpg

    Also, there is this guide to selecting products to support DT & HM on Enabling eLearning which uses the design thinking process as a way of thinking about what you might purchase. It includes:

    Empathy

    Start by considering your "end users" (teachers and students) and their needs:

    • Who will use the product?
    • What have they used before?
    • What is needed (skills, abilities, prior knowledge) to use it?
    • What do we already do in this space?
    • Why do we need a product?
    • How does it fit with our school’s vision for teaching and learning?

     

    Define

    • What do we need our products to do to support DT & HM?
    • What programming languages can be used and how appropriate are they for students at various stages?
    • What additional resources are available or might be needed?
    • How robust do the products need to be?
    • Will they work within existing school infrastructure and the types devices already available to us?
    • Are they well supported with a community and online resources?
    • Consider the choice and costs of peripherals, software, and add-ons that are likely to be needed up-front or in future. Think about:
      • storage
      • batteries/chargers
      • spares if parts are lost or damaged
      • software and hardware needed to program or control the product.

     

    Ideate

    • Research possible products and the pros and cons of each.
    • Look for examples, experiences, reviews, and recommendations from a variety of sources such as a range of commercial suppliers, other schools, and online communities. To do this you could:
      • talk with teachers and students in other kura or schools that have similar needs and technologies to understand their experiences
      • consider joining the Digital Technology Teachers Aotearoa  and follow the active discussions
      • add a discussion topic to the Technologies section of the Virtual Learning Network  or in other online forums or social networks
      • read online reviews of the technology, ideally about its use in kura or schools.
    • Research the level of support available for the product in terms of:
      • the presence and vitality of a community that also use the product
      • the breadth, suitability, and quality of resources provided by the manufacturer and others to assist you in implementing the product into your teaching programmes
      • the after-sales service provided by the reseller and manufacturer.
    • See:
    • Visit Technology Online .
    • Read blogposts.
    • Filter to narrow down to a few possibilities.

     

    Prototype

    • Get hands-on with as many possible products as you think you need to. A variety of products will enable students to be exposed to a range of approaches suitable for their particular stage of development or interests.
    • Seek feedback from a range of teachers and students. Are the products fun to use and easy to get started with? This will mean they are likely to be more engaging.
    • Test whether the product meets the level of quality that will be suitable for your needs.
    • Are the products robust, versatile, open-ended, and able to be used to solve authentic problems rather than narrowly focused on a particular functionality?

     

    Test

    • How do the products measure against your criteria?
    • Purchase test products for piloting/trialling.

     

    Procurement considerations

    Focus on purpose

    Be clear about the intended vision and desired approaches to learning. Ensure you are able to justify your procurement in terms of how it will support and improve learning for your students.

    Involve others

    Take a team approach to procurement. The risks and complexities are too great for one person to be able to determine and manage effectively. Consult with staff and students about what they think their needs and preferences are.  

    Overall cost includes time

    The purchase cost of digital technologies are just part of the overall cost. Integrating digital technologies takes a lot of time. The time costs include:

    • time to get the technologies set up and working
    • time for maintenance
    • time for professional learning
    • time for the end-user as they learn how to use the technology.

    The various costs of people’s time are usually greater than the initial purchase cost.

    Local versus international suppliers

    We now have easy access to overseas online marketplaces such as aliexpress.com. These sites can provide cheaper alternatives to procuring from a local reseller. The Commerce Commission offers the following quick tips for buying online:

    • Be savvy: if you have any doubts or the offer seems too good to be true, don’t proceed.
    • Know who you’re dealing with: search the seller online, look at their online auction feedback, check review sites, social media, Scamwatch  and similar to see what other customers have experienced. Check where the business is based and that it provides its name, street address, phone, and email details.
    • Know what you’re buying: read the description of the goods or services closely, especially any fine print. Read the terms and conditions, including what happens if there’s a problem.
    • Work out what it will cost: factor in shipping, exchange rates, insurance, or any applicable extra charges, such as customs duty.
    • Shop around: search online and compare prices, terms and conditions.
    • Protect yourself: only buy if you are comfortable with the payment method and keep a record of the transaction details. Purchasing by credit card or a secure payment system like PayPal should give you more protection than a cash transfer.

    Before purchasing from an international supplier, consider:

    • finding out from others if they have used or know about the online provider and what their experiences are
    • how easy will it be to return faulty products in future or get other kinds of after-sales service?
    • how can you be sure the quality of the products is good enough?
    • how easy will the overall transaction be?

     

    Price versus value

    The overall costs during the lifetime of the technology need to be determined. Technology that costs more up-front but lasts longer because it is more robust may give better value than something that has a lower initial cost but has a shorter lifetime. Similarly, something may cost more up-front but will have lower running costs, such as consumables like batteries. Also, consider the longevity of your product – how long will it be until the product becomes too out of date to be useful?

     

    - By Clive Francis
      • Clive Francis
        By Clive Francis
        Jan 17

        Also, there is this guide to selecting products to support DT & HM on Enabling eLearning which uses the design thinking process as a way of thinking about what you might purchase. It includes:

        Empathy

        Start by considering your "end users" (teachers and students) and their needs:

        • Who will use the product?
        • What have they used before?
        • What is needed (skills, abilities, prior knowledge) to use it?
        • What do we already do in this space?
        • Why do we need a product?
        • How does it fit with our school’s vision for teaching and learning?

         

        Define

        • What do we need our products to do to support DT & HM?
        • What programming languages can be used and how appropriate are they for students at various stages?
        • What additional resources are available or might be needed?
        • How robust do the products need to be?
        • Will they work within existing school infrastructure and the types devices already available to us?
        • Are they well supported with a community and online resources?
        • Consider the choice and costs of peripherals, software, and add-ons that are likely to be needed up-front or in future. Think about:
          • storage
          • batteries/chargers
          • spares if parts are lost or damaged
          • software and hardware needed to program or control the product.

         

        Ideate

        • Research possible products and the pros and cons of each.
        • Look for examples, experiences, reviews, and recommendations from a variety of sources such as a range of commercial suppliers, other schools, and online communities. To do this you could:
          • talk with teachers and students in other kura or schools that have similar needs and technologies to understand their experiences
          • consider joining the Digital Technology Teachers Aotearoa  and follow the active discussions
          • add a discussion topic to the Technologies section of the Virtual Learning Network  or in other online forums or social networks
          • read online reviews of the technology, ideally about its use in kura or schools.
        • Research the level of support available for the product in terms of:
          • the presence and vitality of a community that also use the product
          • the breadth, suitability, and quality of resources provided by the manufacturer and others to assist you in implementing the product into your teaching programmes
          • the after-sales service provided by the reseller and manufacturer.
        • See:
        • Visit Technology Online .
        • Read blogposts.
        • Filter to narrow down to a few possibilities.

         

        Prototype

        • Get hands-on with as many possible products as you think you need to. A variety of products will enable students to be exposed to a range of approaches suitable for their particular stage of development or interests.
        • Seek feedback from a range of teachers and students. Are the products fun to use and easy to get started with? This will mean they are likely to be more engaging.
        • Test whether the product meets the level of quality that will be suitable for your needs.
        • Are the products robust, versatile, open-ended, and able to be used to solve authentic problems rather than narrowly focused on a particular functionality?

         

        Test

        • How do the products measure against your criteria?
        • Purchase test products for piloting/trialling.

         

        Procurement considerations

        Focus on purpose

        Be clear about the intended vision and desired approaches to learning. Ensure you are able to justify your procurement in terms of how it will support and improve learning for your students.

        Involve others

        Take a team approach to procurement. The risks and complexities are too great for one person to be able to determine and manage effectively. Consult with staff and students about what they think their needs and preferences are.  

        Overall cost includes time

        The purchase cost of digital technologies are just part of the overall cost. Integrating digital technologies takes a lot of time. The time costs include:

        • time to get the technologies set up and working
        • time for maintenance
        • time for professional learning
        • time for the end-user as they learn how to use the technology.

        The various costs of people’s time are usually greater than the initial purchase cost.

        Local versus international suppliers

        We now have easy access to overseas online marketplaces such as aliexpress.com. These sites can provide cheaper alternatives to procuring from a local reseller. The Commerce Commission offers the following quick tips for buying online:

        • Be savvy: if you have any doubts or the offer seems too good to be true, don’t proceed.
        • Know who you’re dealing with: search the seller online, look at their online auction feedback, check review sites, social media, Scamwatch  and similar to see what other customers have experienced. Check where the business is based and that it provides its name, street address, phone, and email details.
        • Know what you’re buying: read the description of the goods or services closely, especially any fine print. Read the terms and conditions, including what happens if there’s a problem.
        • Work out what it will cost: factor in shipping, exchange rates, insurance, or any applicable extra charges, such as customs duty.
        • Shop around: search online and compare prices, terms and conditions.
        • Protect yourself: only buy if you are comfortable with the payment method and keep a record of the transaction details. Purchasing by credit card or a secure payment system like PayPal should give you more protection than a cash transfer.

        Before purchasing from an international supplier, consider:

        • finding out from others if they have used or know about the online provider and what their experiences are
        • how easy will it be to return faulty products in future or get other kinds of after-sales service?
        • how can you be sure the quality of the products is good enough?
        • how easy will the overall transaction be?

         

        Price versus value

        The overall costs during the lifetime of the technology need to be determined. Technology that costs more up-front but lasts longer because it is more robust may give better value than something that has a lower initial cost but has a shorter lifetime. Similarly, something may cost more up-front but will have lower running costs, such as consumables like batteries. Also, consider the longevity of your product – how long will it be until the product becomes too out of date to be useful?

         

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